Candidate and Campaign Contact Information

Contact Info

Address
Committee To Elect Sean Delahanty
C/O Dolores Delahanty
1501 Iroquois Parkway
Louisville, KY 40214
Mobile
502-931-3593
Email Accounts

campaign@fordelahanty.com

sean@fordelahanty.com – Judge Sean Delahanty

dolores@fordelahanty.com – Campaign Manager

matthew@fordelahanty.com – Technical

Contact The Campaign

Use this form to contact the campaign. Volunteer, Donations and Yard Signs have their own pages accessible from the header menu at the top of the page.

Recent FAQs

Louisville Election FAQs – Visit our extensive FAQ section for voter information on a wide selection of topics and interests.

District Court Information

The current 2018 Jefferson County District Court Judges in Louisville, KY’s 30th District are
Division 1: Annette Karem
Division 2: Amber B. Wolf
Division 3: Sandra L. McLaughlin
Division 4: Todd Hollenbach
Division 5: Jennifer Leibson
Division 6: Sean R. Delahanty
Division 7: Jennifer Bryant Wilcox
Division 8: David P. Bowles
Division 9: Andre L. Bergeron
Division 10: Sara Michael Nicholson
Division 11: Jessica Moore
Division 12: Eric Haner
Division 13: Anne Delahanty
Division 14: Stephanie Pearce Burke
Division 15: Anne Haynie
Division 16: Katie King
Division 17: Erica Lee Williams

 

What is Arraignment Court

An arraignment in Arraignment Court is a court proceeding at which a criminal defendant is formally advised of the charges against him and is asked to enter a plea to the charges. In many states, the court may also decide at arraignment whether the defendant will be released pending trial.

The Arraignment Process

Arraignment is the initial court hearing whereby a person charged with a crime is advised of his or her criminal charges. Additionally, the person will be advised of his or her constitutional rights and their first pre-trial or probable cause hearing date. The court will set bond and any accompanying conditions. For example, someone may be released on his or her own recognizance (R.O.R.) but prohibited from contact with the alleged victim or place of the violation. Those defendants with some form of suspended or probated sentences may also expect to be served with written notice of the prosecutor’s intent to seek revocation of that jail sentence. For those facing felony charges who are not released or do not post bond, the prosecutor must provide a preliminary or probable cause hearing on or before the 10th day after arraignment, excluding weekends and holidays. Those individuals who are charged with a felony and released from jail are entitled to a probable cause hearing within 20 days of their arraignment, again excluding weekends and holidays.
If the person is in custody, his or her arraignment will be held at the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections. You will not be permitted inside the secure courtroom; however, the court has set up a room for relatives and interested parties to watch the arraignment on a closed-circuit two-way television system. When your friend or loved one appears before the judge, you may appear at a lectern that has a two-way camera with the judge. The judge may ask you questions regarding the defendant’s living arrangements, ties to the community, employment and other information the court may be interested in securing to determine an appropriate bond or conditions for release.

 

Complete list of candidates for District Court Judges in Louisville.  Voters will pick one candidate per division.  Sean Delahanty is the District Court Judge in Division Six.  Division six candidates are in bold below.  Candidates who filed for District Court with the Secretary of State’s office were:

Louisville District Court Candidates
Annette Karem 1804 Aberdeen Drive
Louisville, KY 40205
District Judge 30th/1st Nonpartisan
Amber B. Wolf 317 Winton Ave.
Louisville, KY 40206
District Judge 30th/2nd Nonpartisan
Tracy Davis 3701 Terrace Hills Drive, #203
Louisville, KY 40245
District Judge 30th/3rd Nonpartisan
Kristina Garvey 3713 Hillsboro Rd.
Louisville, KY 40207
District Judge 30th/3rd Nonpartisan
L. J. “Todd” Hollenbach IV. 317 Jarvis Lane
Louisville, KY 40207
District Judge 30th/4th Nonpartisan
Julie Kaelin 1404 Debarr Street
Louisville, KY 40204
District Judge 30th/4th Nonpartisan
Jennifer H. Leibson 7607 Old Orchard Ct.
Louisville, KY 40222
District Judge 30th/5th Nonpartisan
Sean R. Delahanty 1381 Tyler Park Drive
Louisville, KY 40204
District Judge 30th/6th Nonpartisan
Lisa L. Langford 6601 Ken Carla Drive
Prospect, KY 40059
District Judge 30th/6th Nonpartisan
Jennifer Bryant Wilcox 1104 Colonel Anderson Parkway
Louisville, KY 40222
District Judge 30th/7th Nonpartisan
David Paul Bowles 3629 Kelly Way
Louisville, KY 40220
District Judge 30th/8th Nonpartisan
Daniel “Danny” Alvarez 2326 Stannye Drive
Louisville, KY 40222
District Judge 30th/9th Nonpartisan
Tanisha Ann Hickerson 4618 Wooded Oak Circle
Louisville, KY 40245
District Judge 30th/9th Nonpartisan
Sara Michael Nicholson 302 Coralberry Road
Louisville, KY 40207
District Judge 30th/10th Nonpartisan
Jessica Ann Moore 3044 Bardstown Rd.
#109
Louisville, KY 40205
District Judge 30th/11th Nonpartisan
Eric Haner 2047 Sherwood Ave.
Louisville, KY 40205
District Judge 30th/12th Nonpartisan
Anne Delahanty 2863 Regan Road
Louisville, KY 40206
District Judge 30th/13th Nonpartisan
Stephanie Pearce Burke 212 Bellemeade Road
Louisville, KY 40222
District Judge 30th/14th Nonpartisan
Anne Haynie P.O. Box 262
Prospect, KY 40059
District Judge 30th/15th Nonpartisan
Katie King 3400 Dutchmans Lane
Louisville, KY 40205
District Judge 30th/16th Nonpartisan
Erica Lee Williams 11106 Rock Bend Way
Louisville, KY 40241
District Judge 30th/17th Nonpartisan
 

District Court is divided into Divisions.  All voters vote in all divisions and each of the numbered divisions serve all of Louisville.

 

Kentucky District Courts are trial courts of limited jurisdiction in Kentucky. Matters heard by the district courts include city and county ordinance violations, juvenile matters, traffic offenses, misdemeanors, probate, preliminary felony hearings, small claims and civil cases involving $4,000 or less. Along with the family courts, the district courts hear cases of domestic violence. Appeals may be heard by the Kentucky Circuit Courts.
There are 60 judicial districts in Kentucky, served by 116 judges. These judges are chosen in nonpartisan elections and serve four-year terms. In the event of midterm vacancies, the governor may appoint a replacement from a list of candidates recommended by the Kentucky Judicial Nominating Commission.
Jefferson County is the 30th district in Kentucky.  The 30th District is divided into divisions. Sean Delahanty is the Division Six Judge and was first elected in 1989.

 

Judicial Election Information

Voters can contribute up to $2000 per election to a judicial candidate’s committee.

 

Kentucky Law Concerning Judicial Donations

Candidates for judicial offices in Kentucky must adhere to the state’s campaign finance laws. These laws regulate the amounts and sources of money given or received for political purposes; in addition, campaign finance laws stipulate disclosure requirements for political contributions and expenditures.

American Bar Association Concerning Judicial Donations

Rule 4.1: Political and Campaign Activities of Judges and Judicial Candidates in General

(A) Except as permitted by law,* or by Rules 4.2, 4.3, and 4.4, a judge or a judicial candidate* shall not:
(1)       act as a leader in, or hold an office in, a political organization;*
(2)       make speeches on behalf of a political organization;
(3)       publicly endorse or oppose a candidate for any public office;
(4)    solicit funds for, pay an assessment to, or make a contribution* to a political organization or a candidate for public office;
(5) attend or purchase tickets  for  dinners  or  other  events sponsored by a political
organization or a candidate for public office;
(6) publicly identify himself or herself as a candidate of a political organization;
(7) seek, accept, or  use  endorsements  from  a  political organization;
(8) personally solicit* or accept campaign contributions other than through a campaign committee authorized by Rule 4.4;
(9) use or permit the use of campaign contributions for the private benefit of the judge, the candidate, or others;
(10) use court staff, facilities, or other court resources in a campaign for judicial office;
(11) knowingly,* or with reckless disregard for the truth, make any false or misleading statement;
(12) make any statement that would reasonably  be  expected  to affect the outcome or impair the fairness of a matter pending* or impending* in any court; or
(13)  in connection with cases, controversies, or issues that are likely to come before the court, make pledges, promises, or commitments that are inconsistent with the impartial* performance of the adjudicative duties of judicial office.
(B) A judge or judicial candidate shall take  reasonable  measures  to ensure that other persons do not undertake, on behalf of the judge or judicial candidate, any activities prohibited under paragraph (A). candidate, any activities prohibited under paragraph (A).
 

The next general election in Louisville, KY will be held November 6, 2018.  Offices on the ballot are largely local municipal, judicial and state legislative seats.

 

nonpartisan election is one where, if a primary is held, it is not for the purpose of narrowing the candidates to one from each party; rather, the top two candidates, regardless of party, typically advance to the general election. At both the primary and general elections, the candidates are listed on the ballot without necessarily designating any party affiliation.
The judges of the Kentucky District Courts are elected in nonpartisan elections. They serve four-year terms and must run for re-election if they wish to serve again.
Kentucky will hold nonpartisan elections for local judicial offices on November 6, 2018. A primary election took place on May 22, 2018. The filing deadline for candidates who wished to run in this election was January 30, 2018.

 

Kentucky Court Information

What is Arraignment Court

An arraignment in Arraignment Court is a court proceeding at which a criminal defendant is formally advised of the charges against him and is asked to enter a plea to the charges. In many states, the court may also decide at arraignment whether the defendant will be released pending trial.

The Arraignment Process

Arraignment is the initial court hearing whereby a person charged with a crime is advised of his or her criminal charges. Additionally, the person will be advised of his or her constitutional rights and their first pre-trial or probable cause hearing date. The court will set bond and any accompanying conditions. For example, someone may be released on his or her own recognizance (R.O.R.) but prohibited from contact with the alleged victim or place of the violation. Those defendants with some form of suspended or probated sentences may also expect to be served with written notice of the prosecutor’s intent to seek revocation of that jail sentence. For those facing felony charges who are not released or do not post bond, the prosecutor must provide a preliminary or probable cause hearing on or before the 10th day after arraignment, excluding weekends and holidays. Those individuals who are charged with a felony and released from jail are entitled to a probable cause hearing within 20 days of their arraignment, again excluding weekends and holidays.
If the person is in custody, his or her arraignment will be held at the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections. You will not be permitted inside the secure courtroom; however, the court has set up a room for relatives and interested parties to watch the arraignment on a closed-circuit two-way television system. When your friend or loved one appears before the judge, you may appear at a lectern that has a two-way camera with the judge. The judge may ask you questions regarding the defendant’s living arrangements, ties to the community, employment and other information the court may be interested in securing to determine an appropriate bond or conditions for release.

 

One Family, One Judge, One Court

Family Court is involved in the most intimate and complex aspects of human nature and social relations. For that reason, Family Court uses a case management process that distinguishes it from other trial courts. With the One Family, One Judge, One Court approach, cases are presented in a single court, allowing the same judge to hear all matters involving a particular family. This reduces the stress that can arise when individuals are shuttled between courts to resolve a variety of issues.

Focusing on the Needs of Families

Because Family Court gives cases involving families and children the highest priority, these cases do not compete with criminal and other civil cases for judicial time. As a division of Circuit Court, which is the highest trial court in Kentucky, Family Court employs full-time judges with the same qualifications as those who serve the other divisions of Circuit Court.
In addition to the family matters heard in Circuit Court, Family Court judges also handle family law matters that were traditionally decided in District Court. Family Court jurisdiction is defined by KRS 23A.100 and 23A.110 and includes the following:

  • Dissolution of marriage
  • Spousal support and equitable
  • Distribution
  • Child custody, support and visitation
  • Paternity, adoption
  • Domestic violence
  • Dependency, neglect and abuse
  • Termination of parental rights
  • Status Offenses (runaways, truancy, beyond control)

Reposted from https://courts.ky.gov/courts/familycourt/Pages/default.aspx

 

Circuit Court is the court of general jurisdiction that hears civil matters involving more than $5,000, capital offenses and felonies, land dispute title cases and contested probate cases. Circuit Court has the power to issue injunctions, writs of prohibition and writs of mandamus and to hear appeals from District Court and administrative agencies.
As a division of Circuit Court with general jurisdiction, the family court division of Circuit Court further retains primary jurisdiction in cases involving dissolution of marriage; child custody; visitation; maintenance and support; equitable distribution of property in dissolution cases; adoption; and, termination of parental rights. In addition to general jurisdiction of Circuit Court, the family court division of Circuit Court, concurrent with the District Court, has jurisdiction over proceedings involving domestic violence and abuse; the Uniform Act on Paternity and the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act; dependency, neglect, and abuse; and, juvenile status offenses.
One judge may serve more than one county within a circuit. Some circuits contain only one county but have several judges, depending on population and caseload. Circuit judges serve in eight-year terms.
District Court is the court of limited jurisdiction and handles juvenile matters, city and county ordinances, misdemeanors, violations, traffic offenses, probate of wills, arraignments, felony probable cause hearings, small claims involving $2,500 or less, civil cases involving $5,000 or less, voluntary and involuntary mental commitments and cases relating to domestic violence and abuse. District judges serve four-year terms.
Information reposted from https://courts.ky.gov/courts/Pages/default.aspx

 


 
Drug Court is a shining example of Kentucky’s success in specialty courts. Instead of spending time in jail, eligible participants complete a substance abuse program supervised by a judge. Drug Court graduates are more likely to return to productive lives and stay gainfully employed, pay child support and meet other obligations.
Kentucky Drug Court was created in 1996 to assist individuals who have entered the criminal justice system as a result of drug use or drug-related criminal activity and are choosing to achieve and maintain recovery. Drug Court combines close court supervision and treatment with other services to intervene and break the cycle of substance abuse, addiction and crime.
The program uses a team approach that requires collaboration among judges, Specialty Court staff, prosecutors, defense counsel, treatment professionals, law enforcement officers and other community agencies. These professionals help addicted individuals regain control of their lives through judicial oversight, intensive supervision and monitoring, participation in substance abuse treatment sessions and self-help groups, frequent and random urine screens, and referrals to community service agencies and other services.
Today there is irrefutable evidence that Drug Court is achieving what it set out to do — substantially reduce drug use and criminal behavior in drug-addicted offenders. For more than 20 years, the program’s solid track record has convinced leaders in state government, along with local judges, prosecutors and treatment providers, that Drug Court is an essential part of the Kentucky court system.
Drug Court operates under the Department of Specialty Courts at the Administrative Office of the Courts.​​
This was reposted from https://courts.ky.gov/courtprograms/drugcourt/Pages/default.aspx

 

Sean Delahanty

My parents who worked hard to improve our community for all of their working lives and well into retirement. My father was well known for representing indigent litigants pro bono particularly in issues of equal housing and human rights. My mother, a social worker, worked full time while raising five children in an era not always kind to women’s issues. Both of my parents are honored in the Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame.

 
Category: Sean Delahanty

I do the best I know how, every day, and my goal is to help people make positive changes in their lives. It is a blessing to work at a job that you enjoy and I frequently hear positive feedback from litigants who have appeared before me.

 
Category: Sean Delahanty

Significant challenges are the opiod crisis, neighborhood violence, jail overcrowding, equal justice for all people who come before the Court. The bench is making strides in offering alternatives to jail for drug addicts. Violence in neighborhoods I believe is driven by the drug trade and can only be solved by improved educational and job opportunities for young people so they can see a successful life in front of them, jail overcrowding may be addressed by alternative incarceration methods and rehabilitation programs. And currently, there is a trend to make changes in the way that bail is set so that indigent individuals will not sit in jail simply because they cannot afford to make bond.

 
Category: Sean Delahanty

Sean Delahanty is the current District Court Division Six Judge and was first elected to this seat in 1989.  Sean served as Chief Judge of the 30th District Court of Kentucky from 2008 to 2011.  Sean has practiced law since 1980.
Read more about Sean Delahanty’s Experience

 
Category: Sean Delahanty

Voter Information

Voting Rights Restoration

In Kentucky, non-violent felons can apply for voting rights registration/record expungement 5 years after their probation or the end of their sentence.  Complete the Restoration of Civil Rights Application and return it to the Kentucky Department Of Corrections address at the bottom of the application.  It can take 12 weeks before the application is processed so completing it early is important.
You can read more about the process and challenges here in Kentucky provided by the Brennan Center.  It discusses the changes Gov. Beshear rook before leaving office and the changes Gov. Matt Bevin took to undo the reforms.
Voting is an important right, despite the current process you should complete the application.  Voting Rights will only be restored if you actively seek them.

Following an executive order on December 22, 2015 by the state’s governor, Kentucky’s felony disenfranchisement law is once again one of the harshest in the nation. Its constitution permanently bars all individuals with past felony convictions from voting, unless the governor restores the right to vote. – Brennan Center

Restoration of Civil Rights 3-2016
 

Complete list of candidates for District Court Judges in Louisville.  Voters will pick one candidate per division.  Sean Delahanty is the District Court Judge in Division Six.  Division six candidates are in bold below.  Candidates who filed for District Court with the Secretary of State’s office were:

Louisville District Court Candidates
Annette Karem 1804 Aberdeen Drive
Louisville, KY 40205
District Judge 30th/1st Nonpartisan
Amber B. Wolf 317 Winton Ave.
Louisville, KY 40206
District Judge 30th/2nd Nonpartisan
Tracy Davis 3701 Terrace Hills Drive, #203
Louisville, KY 40245
District Judge 30th/3rd Nonpartisan
Kristina Garvey 3713 Hillsboro Rd.
Louisville, KY 40207
District Judge 30th/3rd Nonpartisan
L. J. “Todd” Hollenbach IV. 317 Jarvis Lane
Louisville, KY 40207
District Judge 30th/4th Nonpartisan
Julie Kaelin 1404 Debarr Street
Louisville, KY 40204
District Judge 30th/4th Nonpartisan
Jennifer H. Leibson 7607 Old Orchard Ct.
Louisville, KY 40222
District Judge 30th/5th Nonpartisan
Sean R. Delahanty 1381 Tyler Park Drive
Louisville, KY 40204
District Judge 30th/6th Nonpartisan
Lisa L. Langford 6601 Ken Carla Drive
Prospect, KY 40059
District Judge 30th/6th Nonpartisan
Jennifer Bryant Wilcox 1104 Colonel Anderson Parkway
Louisville, KY 40222
District Judge 30th/7th Nonpartisan
David Paul Bowles 3629 Kelly Way
Louisville, KY 40220
District Judge 30th/8th Nonpartisan
Daniel “Danny” Alvarez 2326 Stannye Drive
Louisville, KY 40222
District Judge 30th/9th Nonpartisan
Tanisha Ann Hickerson 4618 Wooded Oak Circle
Louisville, KY 40245
District Judge 30th/9th Nonpartisan
Sara Michael Nicholson 302 Coralberry Road
Louisville, KY 40207
District Judge 30th/10th Nonpartisan
Jessica Ann Moore 3044 Bardstown Rd.
#109
Louisville, KY 40205
District Judge 30th/11th Nonpartisan
Eric Haner 2047 Sherwood Ave.
Louisville, KY 40205
District Judge 30th/12th Nonpartisan
Anne Delahanty 2863 Regan Road
Louisville, KY 40206
District Judge 30th/13th Nonpartisan
Stephanie Pearce Burke 212 Bellemeade Road
Louisville, KY 40222
District Judge 30th/14th Nonpartisan
Anne Haynie P.O. Box 262
Prospect, KY 40059
District Judge 30th/15th Nonpartisan
Katie King 3400 Dutchmans Lane
Louisville, KY 40205
District Judge 30th/16th Nonpartisan
Erica Lee Williams 11106 Rock Bend Way
Louisville, KY 40241
District Judge 30th/17th Nonpartisan
 

Check Your Registration Status

Voters can check their registration status at the Kentucky Secretary of State’s site.


Check Your Registration Status
 

You may register to vote if you are:

  • A native-born or naturalized U.S. citizen who is 18 years old by the date of the next General Election
  • A resident of the state and county at least 28 days before the election
  • A convicted felon whose civil rights have been legally restored
  • Any citizen who has not been judged “mentally incompetent” in a court of law
  • Any citizen who does not claim the right to vote outside Kentucky

A link to register online is below, or you may call the Election Center at (502) 574-6100 to request that a registration card be mailed to you.

Register To Vote Online

 

Finding Your Polling Location

The Jefferson County Clerk’s Office handles polling locations and elections.  The link below will open in an additional window so you don’t lose your place on our site.  If you have issues reaching the site due to a popup window their address is http://www.jeffersoncountyclerk.org/WhereDoIVote/
not secure
A quick note about their site.  For whatever reason the Jefferson County Clerk’s Office website does not use an SSL certificate which is the cornerstone of modern day secure web sites.  Because they do not have this basic layer of security we are unable to display their site on our page.  Our site uses SSL certificates meaning your data look up would be secure, since they do not you’ll likely see a notice when access their site that your information is not secure.  This is their site’s issue.

 

 

Load More